Tag Archives: anger

Top 20 favorite pit bull advocate sayings:

#20 – All pit bulls are never hurt anyone.

#19- Damn Nutters need to listen to my personal anecdotes about how well pitty and my daughter get along and get educated… HUE HUE HUE

#19 – I hope my pit bulls rip off their face and eat it for thanksgiving.

#18-.DOGS BITE ARE LIARS

#17- Oh, so you were “allegedly” bitten? Oh, you got 32 stitches in your face? Oh- it was done by a pit bull? Well, you provoked it.

#16- what pretty dogs…

#15- dead children are better than restricting a dog any day.

#14 – That’s not a pit bull and don’t let anyone tell you it IS!!!

#13- A pit by any other name is still a pit. Luckily most of the public isn’t taken in.

#12- we are the silent majority

#11- every dog can be rehabilitated

#10- did you get a non pet store pit?

#09- is that BSL ?

#08- the media is lying!

#07- child provocation !

#06- sacrificing your kid on our pit bull alter!

#05- Everyone needs to own one

#04- a drop of non pit blood ruins the dog!

#03- you know what “mix” means… It’s not a pit bull.

#02- who do they think they are? They don’t know who they are messing with!

#01- why are they picking on meeee? Why are they being so meeeeaaan?

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The shocking secret history of pit bulls – locking jaw , aggression, anger , hatred


The shocking secret history of pit bulls – Pitbulls have been genetically bred to fight , to bite and not let go , have locking jaws – not real locking jaws but once they bite they dont let go . Bred mixing the locking jaw and fighting style of a bull dog and the will to fight of a terrier, only the best bull fighting dogs remained for 100 years . Only the strongest pit bulls remained from their life in fighting pits where fights would go for hours . Now advocates want you to believe these pit fighters make good pets

Genetics of pit bull owners – more aggressive people own pit bulls – pit bull owners have more anger, hostility and aggression.

Your pit bull might be saying more about you than you realize, new research finds.

Owners of stereotypically aggressive dog breeds such as pit bulls and Rottweilers are more likely to be hostile and aggressive themselves compared with owners of typically laid-back pooches such as Labrador retrievers, according to a new study.

In this study, aggressive dog-breed owners scored higher in the personality trait of psychoticism, which is marked by anger, hostility and aggression. (Psychoticism is different than psychopathy, a personality disorder characterized by manipulativeness and lack of empathy.)

“This might imply (although has yet to be proven) that people choose pets that are an extension of themselves,” study researcher Deborah Wells, a psychologist at Queen’s University Belfast, told LiveScience in an email.

Dogs and personality

The research, published in the October 2012 issue of the journal Personality and Individual Differences, is not the first to find personality differences in dog owners based on breed. Toy-dog owners, for example, score high on the personality trait of openness, characterized by appreciation of new experiences, according to a study presented at the British Psychological Society annual conference in London in April. The same study found that owners of pastoral and utility breeds such as collies and corgis were the most extroverted. [See What Your Dog’s Breed Says About You]

Likewise, a study published in May in the journal Anthrozoos found that people with more argumentative personalities are more likely to choose bull terriers or other breeds with a reputation for aggression than more agreeable types.

Aggressive owners, aggressive breeds

Wells and her colleague Peter Hepper, also of Queen’s University Belfast, recruited 147 dog owners from obedience classes in Northern Ireland and asked them to fill out a personality questionnaire. Only owners of German shepherds, Rottweilers, Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers were included in the questionnaire.

“We deliberately wanted to focus on breeds that are commonly owned, but at opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of public perception of temperament — both Germans shepherds and Rottweilers are commonly perceived to be aggressive, while labs and retrievers (breeds frequently used to advertise organizations such as Guide Dogs for the Blind) are more likely to regarded in a nonaggressive light,” Wells said.

Of the personality traits studied, the only difference between breed types that emerged was in psychoticism, such that owners of stereotypically aggressive breeds were more aggressive themselves than owners of more relaxed dogs.

The study still leaves open the question of whether aggressive people choose aggressive dog breeds and then intentionally train them to be vicious, Wells said. Other factors beyond personality, such as allergies and size, can also influence dog-breed choice, she added.